Are you faced with a situation where you need to tighten or loosen a small screw but don’t have a tiny screwdriver? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! In this article, we will explore some creative alternatives that you can use to get the job done without a tiny screwdriver. So, whether you’re in the middle of a DIY project, need to fix a loose hinge, or simply can’t find your trusty screwdriver, read on to discover some handy solutions that will help you tackle those pesky screws.

Sometimes, the perfect tool isn’t always readily available. But fear not! We’ve compiled a list of ingenious alternatives that can serve as makeshift screwdrivers in a pinch. From using a coin to employing a small knife or even a paperclip, these unconventional options might just save the day when you find yourself without a tiny screwdriver. So, let’s dive into these resourceful solutions and find out how you can continue your repair or project without missing a beat.

What to Use if You Don’t Have a Tiny Screwdriver?

When faced with a situation where you don’t have a tiny screwdriver, there are several alternative tools and methods you can use to get the job done. Here are some options:

1. Flat-Head Screwdriver: If you don’t have a tiny screwdriver, a flat-head screwdriver can be a good substitute. While it may not fit perfectly, you can use the flat end of the screwdriver to turn the screws by applying pressure and turning slowly. However, be cautious as the flat-head screwdriver may not provide the same level of precision as a tiny screwdriver.

2. Butter Knife: In a pinch, a butter knife can be used as a makeshift screwdriver. The flat end of the knife can be used to turn the screws, but it’s important to note that this method may not work for screws that require a lot of force or precision. Exercise caution to prevent any accidental injuries while using a butter knife as a screwdriver.

3. Coin: Another option for turning small screws is to use a coin. Select a coin that closely matches the width of the screw head and position it in the screw head’s grooves. Apply pressure and turn the coin to loosen or tighten the screw. Coins can work well for larger screws, but they may not fit in smaller or more delicate screw heads.

4. Paperclip: A paperclip can be bent into a makeshift screwdriver when you don’t have a tiny screwdriver on hand. Straighten the paperclip as much as possible and use the pointed end to turn the screws. This method works best for small screws and can be especially useful for electronic devices such as laptops or smartphones.

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5. Eyeglass Screwdriver: If you don’t have a tiny screwdriver, but have a pair of eyeglasses, you can use the small screwdriver that typically comes with them. The size and shape of the eyeglass screwdriver are often suitable for handling tiny screws. Keep in mind that this option may not be ideal if you don’t wear glasses or don’t have access to an eyeglass screwdriver.

6. Needle: A needle can be used as a substitute for a tiny screwdriver when dealing with very small screws. The sharp point of the needle can be inserted into the screw head and turned carefully to loosen or tighten the screw. However, it’s important to exercise caution as needles can be fragile and may break if excessive force is applied.

7. Nail File: In some cases, a nail file can be used as an alternative to a tiny screwdriver. The flat edge of the nail file can be inserted into the screw head and turned slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. However, keep in mind that nail files are not designed for this purpose, so they may not provide the same level of precision and control as a proper screwdriver.

8. Pliers: If you have a pair of pliers with a narrow tip, they can be used to grip and turn small screws. Position the pliers’ tip on the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. While pliers may not be as precise as a tiny screwdriver, they can be a useful alternative in certain situations.

9. Tweezers: Tweezers with a pointed or flat edge can sometimes be used to turn small screws. The pointed edge of the tweezers can be inserted into the screw head, and gentle pressure can be applied to turn the screw. However, keep in mind that not all tweezers are suitable for this purpose, so choose ones with a sturdy build.

10. Allen Wrench (Hex Key): If you have an Allen wrench or hex key set, you may be able to find a size that fits the small screws you’re working with. Insert the appropriate end of the Allen wrench or hex key into the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. This method can provide better control and precision compared to some other makeshift options.

11. Small Drill Bit: In some cases, a small drill bit can be used as an alternative to a tiny screwdriver. Select a drill bit that matches the size of the screw head and carefully position it in the screw head. Apply gentle pressure and slowly rotate the drill bit to turn the screw. However, this method requires caution to avoid damaging the screw or the surrounding material.

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12. Bobby Pin: A bobby pin can be bent into a makeshift screwdriver when needed. Straighten the bobby pin as much as possible and use the pointed end to turn the screws. This method is suitable for small screws and can be particularly helpful when you’re on the go and don’t have access to traditional tools.

13. Credit Card: In certain situations, a credit card or similar plastic card can be used to turn small screws. Insert the edge of the card into the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. This method may not work for screws that require a lot of force or precision, so proceed with caution.

14. Multi-tool: If you have a multi-tool that includes various attachments, you may find a suitable one for turning small screws. Look for attachments such as a small flat-head screwdriver or a hex key that matches the screw head size. Multi-tools can be versatile and provide a range of options when you don’t have a dedicated tiny screwdriver.

15. Small Socket Wrench: A small socket wrench set can be used as an alternative to a tiny screwdriver, especially for larger screws. Select the appropriate socket size that matches the screw head and attach it to the wrench handle. Place the socket on the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. However, keep in mind that this method may not provide the same level of precision as a dedicated screwdriver.

16. Small Coin or Washer: When dealing with larger screws, you can use a small coin or washer as a makeshift screwdriver. Place the coin or washer on the screw head and apply pressure while turning to loosen or tighten the screw. This method can be handy when you don’t have a dedicated tool available.

17. Small Allen Key: Similar to an Allen wrench or hex key, a small Allen key can be used to turn tiny screws. Insert the appropriate end of the Allen key into the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. This method provides better control and precision compared to some other makeshift options.

18. Small Wrench: If you have a small wrench that matches the size of the screw head, it can work as an alternative to a tiny screwdriver. Place the wrench on the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. While a small wrench may not fit all screw heads, it can be a useful option for larger screws.

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19. Side Cutters: Side cutters, also known as diagonal pliers, can be used to grip and turn small screws. Position the side cutters’ tip on the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. While side cutters may not provide the same level of precision as a tiny screwdriver, they can be a practical alternative in certain situations.

20. Small Needle-Nose Pliers: Needle-nose pliers with a narrow tip can be used to grip and turn small screws. Position the pliers’ tip on the screw head and turn slowly to loosen or tighten the screw. While needle-nose pliers may not offer the same level of control as a tiny screwdriver, they can be a viable option when other tools are not available.

How to Unscrew a Screw Without a Screwdriver


In conclusion, there are several alternatives to consider if you find yourself in need of loosening or tightening a small screw but don’t have a tiny screwdriver on hand. These options can save the day when you’re faced with a stubborn screw and limited tools.

Firstly, one option is to use a substitute tool that is commonly found in most households – a small flathead or Phillips head screwdriver. While it may not be as precise as a tiny screwdriver, you can still use the tip of the larger screwdriver to fit into the grooves of the small screw head. This requires a steady hand and some patience, but it can get the job done in a pinch.

Secondly, if you don’t have a small screwdriver or a substitute tool available, you can try using a pair of needle-nose pliers. These pliers have slim, pointed jaws that can grip the small screw head and allow you to turn it. Be cautious not to apply too much force, as this may damage the screw or surrounding materials.

Lastly, if you’re unable to find any suitable tools, you can improvise by using a non-traditional item such as a coin. Depending on the size of the screw head, you can try inserting the edge of a coin into the grooves and turning it. This method may not be as effective or precise as using the proper tool, but it can provide a temporary solution until you can obtain the right equipment.

In conclusion, while it’s always best to have the correct tools for the job, there are alternatives available if you find yourself without a tiny screwdriver. By using a substitute tool, such as a larger screwdriver or needle-nose pliers, or even improvising with a coin, you can successfully loosen or tighten small screws when needed. Remember to exercise caution and patience when using these alternatives to avoid any damage.

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